MOUNTAIN LIFE - Blue Mountains | Summer 2019

He then dehydrates them, and either grinds them up into cricket flour or dry roasts them for snacks. He sells bags of barbecue-flavoured crickets, lemon-pepper crickets, cricket flour. He has made cricket bark, banana bread with cricket flour, and is constantly experimenting. The use for crickets is endless. But the real question is: Why would anyone eat crickets? The practise of entomophagy, or eating insects has been practised for thousands of years. It is claimed that 2 billion people worldwide, still eat insects regularly. Think South America, Asia and Africa. For whatever reason, the Western world has shunned insects as a food source, but crickets are ridiculously good for you. According to Shouldice, crickets feature twice the iron of spinach, more B12 than salmon, all nine essential amino acids, plus high levels of potassium and calcium while also supporting the growth of beneficial gut bacteria. And environmentally speaking, crickets are an amazing alternative to modern-day farming techniques. Especially when it comes to protein. Shouldice claims that crickets use 2 percent of the water, 12 percent of the land and 10 percent of the feed, when compared to cattle. They also produce only 1 percent of the methane compared to cows. Plus, huge amounts of forest don’t need to be razed to farm them. But seriously, why would you eat them? And herein lies Shouldice’s biggest challenge: getting people to wrap their head around eating an insect. “I have dry roasted, flavoured crickets and cricket powder,” he says. “We’ve made chocolate bark, like cricket bark, and that’s strictly as an entry point. It’s like eating Rice Krispies and chocolate. So that’s just for people to get mentally over it. They’ve eaten a cricket. Fine. Done. You get the badge. I will make some badges when I get to my first farmers' market.” So what do they taste like? They’re actually pretty good; crunchy, light, they almost have the texture of a cheesie. And flavour-wise, they taste a bit like sunflower seeds. The lemon-pepper ones are delicious and could totally replace a bag of chips during a barbecue. That is, if everyone was willing to try them. Want to try them yourself? Shouldice plans to attend the Owen Sound Farmers' Market this summer. Or if you head over to yescrickets.com , you can order crickets to be shipped right to your door. Bon appétit! “We’ve made chocolate bark, like cricket bark, as an entry point. It’s like eating Rice Krispies and chocolate. So that’s just for people to get mentally over it. They’ve eaten a cricket. Fine. Done. You get the badge.” Charge ahead on life’s great adventures with the comfort, fit and support of the versatile New Sawtooth II Collection. #LeadTheWay

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