100 Years Later, Returning to Photograph Mountain Vistas From the Exact Same Spot

It’s an eye-opening look back in time, when vast stretches of mountain vistas weren’t marked with strings of powerlines, and dense evergreen forests were just beginning to bud.

 

 

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The Mountain Legacy Project, an interdisciplinary research team based in the Visualization Lab at the School of Environmental Studies at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, has been returning to the exact same spots where geological survey images were taken over 100 years ago in hopes to document and track changes. The collection of images now reaches into the thousands.

 

 

The Project’s extensive archive of images shows  changes in water levels, forest density, glacial depth and human encroachment on the environment.

 

 

The project’s goal is to investigate landscape ecology, ecological restoration, and social perspectives on the mountainous landscapes of western Canada through repeat photography and archival research. Check out the database here, but be prepared to lose hours of your day.

 

 

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