Low Pressure Podcast: The Forecast is Calling for Relaxed Conversation

Low Pressure Podcast
Mark Warner talks the walk, in ski boots. RICH GLASS PHOTO.

According to the experts, Mark Warner’s Low Pressure Podcast shouldn’t work. We live in a “time-starved society,” they say, a world of insta-everything where information is created, curated, and consumed faster than ever before. A 54-page study, released by Microsoft in May 2015, concluded that the human attention span has dropped to just eight seconds—that’s 1 second less than a goldfish.

By Feet Banks

Warner’s Low Pressure Podcast is an optimistic exception. Episodes are anywhere from 45–60 minutes long and feature real-time conversations with some of the most interesting personalities in skiing talking about the joys, trials and nuances of sliding on snow and enjoying the mountains.

“A podcast gets you way more in-depth than video or writing,” Warner says. “This way you get to hear your favourite skier or personality from the industry and get a sense of who they really are and what makes them tick.“

article continues below

Mark started planning the Low Pressure Podcast in 2012 after failing to find a good ski podcast online.

“I was making dinner and looking for one,” he says, “and I couldn’t find anything, which was a surprise because there are podcasts about everything. There are literally a dozen knitting podcasts.”

“A podcast gets you way more in-depth than video or writing,” Warner says. “This way you get to hear your favourite skier or personality from the industry and get a sense of who they really are and what makes them tick.“

After a winter of planning and mulling the idea over, the Low Pressure Podcast launched in November 2013 with an episode-per-week schedule over the winter months and sporadic summer sessions. In 40-plus episodes so far, Mark has talked to a wide and interesting cross section of skiing—everyone from Olympians to bootfitters, to pow-chasing pros and more. Produced from his living room in Whistler (or sometimes out in the mountains), Warner says there is no shortage of quality interviews in the Sea to Sky Corridor.

“The mountains are huge and the people I want to talk to either live here or come here to ski,” he says. “As the show grows, I do want to travel more though. I did four episodes from Japan last winter and that was important because I don’t want it to become just a Whistler podcast. It’s been downloaded in 92 countries so the audience is definitely diverse.”

With new support from Whistler Blackcomb and Arc’teryx, Mark is looking forward to Season Three.

“I want to do more topic-oriented shows and keep it varied. I’m not against talking to snowboarders either; people like Jeremy Jones or Marie-France Roy are athletes who really transcend their sport. If I think my audience will relate to a story, I will put it out. There really are no rules.”

Nor should there be—it’s a goldfish’s world, we just ski here.

Listen to episodes here.

Check out more from the new Mountain Life Coast Mountains issue here.

Comments